Urban Agriculture
Article 89 - Headed for community meetings.
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For Immediate Release
May 14, 2013
Released By:
Food Initiatives
For More Information Contact:
Mayor's Office of Food Initiatives
Peter.Murphy@cityofboston.gov

Since January 2012, the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA), the Mayor’s Office of Food Initiatives, and the Mayor’s Urban Agriculture Rezoning Working Group have been meeting monthly to draft new zoning to open up new urban agriculture opportunities in Boston. Article 89 of the zoning code will create clarity and predictability for anyone interested in commercial food growing and creating farms in Boston. A draft of the new zoning article is now finalized and available online.

 

We want your input on the proposed zoning! Stay tuned for a full schedule of neighborhood meetings on urban agriculture this summer. You can also join the conversation on Twitter using #UrbanAgBos

 

Why Urban Agriculture is good for Boston:

  • Community based farms can bring people together, increasing cooperation, collaboration and neighborhood building.
  • Urban agriculture improves access to affordable, fresh, healthy food.
  • Urban farming provides an opportunity for Bostonians to learn how to grow food, and empowers entrepreneurs to operate a farm right in the City.
  • Local farming can be an effective tool for empowering youth, by teaching young people how to grow food and run a business.
  • Urban farming teaches us about using land wisely, which helps us grow our neighborhoods and communities in a positive and healthy way.
  • Farming in the city is good for the environment because it can reduce transportation costs and carbon emissions on the buyer and grower’s end.
  • Urban farming is a great way to get Bostonians excited about sustainability and “greenovation,” so that we can make this a cleaner, healthier city.

Why we are creating Article 89:

  • The existing Boston zoning code does not address many types of agricultural activities.  If an activity is not identified, it is considered a forbidden use and requires an appeal process through the City’s Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA).

Urban Agriculture Kick Off, January 2012 Flier

Notes from Urban Agriculture Working Group Meetings

Announcements

Related Links